Parliament has passed legislation that provides a stronger legal framework to protect copyrights, especially with new technologies available that can take advantage of the Internet....Pro-music website turns one year...


        Police in collaboration with the International Federation of Phonographic Industry (IFPI) representatives, raided a commerical premises at 19 Kim Keat Road, a factory manufacturing pirated music Compact Discs (CDs). The operation which took place on 1 Mar 2004 at 11am led to the discovery of stampers or master copies of a popular artiste as well as stampers of 3 other music CDs belonging to members of IFPI and a movie belonging to the Motion Picture Assoication of Singapore. Documents used in the production and sale of stampers and CDs were also seized for investigations. There were 6 CDs duplication machines and a stamper-making machine inside the factory premises. Police believe that the factory makes stampers from oringinal CDs and thereafter duplicates them on a commercial scale. The CDs were of very high quality and even the codes were copied. The packaging were also done in the factory premises.

        The Police in collaboration with the International Federation of Phonographic Industry (IFPI) and the Recording Industry Association of Singapore (RIAS) had received information in late 2003 that pirated copies of popular song artistes are available in the retail outlets. The pirated copies were of very high quality and only the trained eye could tell them apart. The Police Intellectual Property Rights Branch (IPRB) officers investigating the information had to send the suspicious CDs to London for examination by the IFPI.

        Representatives of IFPI are assisting the Intellectual Property Rights Branch, CID investigators in identifiying the infringing articles. The operation is an ongoing and continuous Police enforcement action in crippling priacy activities operating in Singapore.

        ASP Deculan Goh, Deputy Head of Intellectual Property Rights Branch of Criminal Investigation Department said, "Police will not condone, let alone tolerate any pirates who attempt to use Singapore as a base for for manufacturing or distribution of counterfeit or infringing articles. We value the excellent working relationship we share with the right holders and will continue to leverage on intelligence and work closely with the brand and copyright owners to cripple any piracy syndicate operating in Singapore."

        Persons found guilty of making for sale or hire an infringing copy shall be punished on conviction to a fine not exceeding $10,000 for the article or for each article in respect of whic the offence was committed or $100,000, whichever is the lower, or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 5 years or to both.

    MORE NEWS

    A collaborative effort between the South East Community Development council and Recording Industry Association (Singapore) (RIAS), the Youth Concert @ South East 2005 on January 29, 2005 provided a platform for many aspiring musicians to showcase their talents....Read on

    Parliament has passed legislation that provides a stronger legal framework to protect copyrights, especially with new technologies available that can take advantage of the Internet...Read on

    Pro-music website www.pro-music.org turns one year...Read on

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