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    The person making the pirate copy is stealing the intellectual input of the creative people behind the original sounding recording. The victims of this crime are the composer, lyricist, the music arranger, the performing artist and the producer of the recording. We, the music lovers, are in turn the ultimate victims as the loss suffered by the industry means less money to invest in new artists, new music and new albums.

    In 2001, the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry estimated the value of the global pirate market at US$4.3 billion. This does not include the losses resulting from illegal downloads and CDR burning. In 2002, RIAS estimates that pirate sales in Singapore amounted to about S$7 million.

    The pirates contribute nothing to the industry. They do not pay royalties to the composers or the performers. They make no investment in the production of the album or the development of new talent. They bear no risk or expenses in marketing and distributing the recordings. Finally, they destroy the livelihood of everyone who is in the music industry.

    The law in Singapore provides that the making, importation, distribution or sale of such unauthorized copies is a violation of the Copyright Act. Any person found guilty of such an offence is liable to a maximum fine of $10,000 per article and/or a maximum jail term of 5 years.

    Pirated music CDs are sold at night markets or 'pasar malams', trade fairs and by street vendors on makeshift stalls. The authorities have however taken very strong enforcement action against these pirate operators. Night markets have continually been raided by police officers from the Criminal Investigation Department (CID).

    "Police will not condone, let alone tolerate any pirates who attempt to use Singapore as a base for for manufacturing or distribution of counterfeit or infringing articles. We value the excellent working relationship we share with the right holders and will continue to leverage on intelligence and work closely with the brand and copyright owners to cripple any piracy syndicate operating in Singapore."

    ASP DECULAN GOH, DEPUTY HEAD
    INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS
    CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DEPARTMENT

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